Blog Archives

O Bookworm, Where Art Thou?

Yesterday, September 6, was apparently Read a Book Day (or so I was informed by a ThinkGeek email).

My Books

So much to read… (Photo credit: Jennerally)

Which made me realize how much I miss reading. I was a voracious bookworm as a child and teen, capable of devouring 200 pages in perhaps 90 minutes. I lived at the public library (to be fair, it was a block from my house). Often, I had two or four books going at once, while able to keep the plots and characters straight. I might get a new book at school and read it while walking home that afternoon. I could read while watching TV or in any other noisy situation.

I don’t read anymore. Unless you count textbooks, psychology articles, tweets, blogs, emails, Facebook posts, class discussion boards… And, of course, the articles and training materials I edit. Read the rest of this entry

When Geekery and Hypnosis Collide

Fact: I am studying to become a Marriage and Family Therapist.
Fact: I love the unique way kids view the world and would like to work with them.
Fact: I believe hypnosis is the most useful therapeutic tool anyone can know or use.

Given all that, ever since Uncommon Knowledge started putting out their Children’s Series of hypnosis downloads, I have been collecting both the MP3s and scripts for each title, as a way of learning how to use hypnosis with my future child clients. And because listening to hypnosis is one of the more effective ways of learning its patterns and language, I listen to each of the children’s titles at least once. (Besides, even adults sometimes just need a comforting bedtime story!)

The latest title in the series, “Speak Up in Class”, aims to help children be more confident in the classroom, not worry about the possibility of being wrong, and be open to making mistakes from which they can learn and improve. All the child-aimed downloads consist of enjoyable and relaxing “dream stories” that your child can listen to at bedtime (or any other time). No mention of hypnosis is made, nor is the goal of the program overtly stated; rather, the story gently relates a solution via metaphor and parallels to reality. (Small plug: from now through March 26, 2012, the program and script for “Speak Up in Class” and all the new March downloads are 15% off for both free and paid site members.)

Fact: I am a geek.

Last night, I listened to “Speak Up in Class” for the first time as I was getting ready to drift off to sleep. The program opens with teaching the child listener “a very special, secret way of breathing” (AKA relaxation breathing), then moves on to describe a playground scene. So far, so good; I was settling in, enjoying the program. And then we met the protagonist of this particular dream story…

“…and there among all those children, a little red-headed girl called Amelia…”

"Amelia Pond...like a name in a fairy tale."

"...like a name in a fairy tale."

Relaxation flew out the window as my geek mind made the inevitable connection (Doctor Who Series 5 and 6 spoiler warning for that link) and I started laughing, then laughed harder because it was Roger, one of Miss Pond’s fellow Scots, who had recorded the program.

Already that far gone, I’m sure my fellow Whovians can sympathize that I completely lost it later in the program on the phrase “silence fell in the classroom”. (If you don’t get it: help is here, with further spoilers.)

(…Sorry, Unk folks!)

My geek-infused amusement aside, “Speak Up in Class” is a great program that I hope will help many kids who feel uneasy sharing what they know (or are unsure they know) in the classroom.

World Mental Health Day

Today, October 10, is World Mental Health Day and, slightly embarrassingly, this nascent mental-health-related blog’s got nuthin’. Why?

Because October 9 is when I was reminded about the existence of World Mental Health Day. And this close to the end of my school term, I didn’t have time to throw something together on such short notice. Over-organizer that I (usually) am, I’ve now set up reminders in Google Calendar to do better next year. ; )

In the meantime, here’s some link love to appropriate reading material:

Mental health: Let’s get back to basics by Mark Tyrrell of Uncommon Knowledge calls for us all “to bring more humanity into helping us all become mentally healthier”.

You could say that to achieve good mental health, we have to admit our own shortcomings, but this can be difficult. Jeremy Dean over at PsyBlog looks at Why People Avoid the Truth About Themselves.

And Therapy Tales takes a stinging look at the under-investment in mental health.

Cheers!

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